June Quick Read on the US Economy

The economic news softened somewhat from my last update.  The payroll numbers for May were especially weak, following a modest April.  However, we should not exaggerate one reading of a volatile series Overall the economy still looks like it is on a decent heading, but evidence has accumulated of at least a small pause in growth.  This is likely to make the FOMC  put off rake hikes.

 

Our Astor Economic Index® (“AEI”) shows growth is lower than last month, though slightly above this year’s lows posted in February.  However, I still see the US as growing above average today. The AEI is a proprietary index that evaluates selected employment and output trends in an effort to gauge the current pace of US economic growth.

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Source: Astor calculations

 

In remarks made on June 6th, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen called the May jobs report “disappointing and concerning”  but she still believed that the fundamentals of the economy are strong.  I tend to agree with the Chairman.  How weak was the jobs report?  In the chart below, I averaged the last three month’s increase in payrolls to smooth out the numbers.    As a result, the increase in payrolls has dropped to an average of 116,000 jobs over the last March-May period.  For most periods since 2012, the increase in payrolls has been in the 175,000-250,000 range, though it has printed this low a few times.  At this stage in the recovery, the s that it will take only 70,000-90,000 jobs a month to keep the unemployment rate stable.  In my opinion the current jobs  report is poor but we need to see additional signs of weakening before we move from concerned to alarmed.

 

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Source:Bureau of Labor Statistics

 

It is not just Astor Investment Management who is still seeing the growth picture as somewhat positive.  The nowcasts maintained by the Federal Reserve Banks of Atlanta and New York both show stronger growth than the first quarter.  The Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta is currently estimating 2.5% and the Federal Reserve Bank of New York is estimating 2.4%.  Both have been updated since the employment report.

 

Where does this leave the Federal Reserve?  The market no longer believes that the June meeting is a real possibility for a rate hike anymore.  I agree.  In Ms. Yellen’s speech, mentioned above, she gave cases both for and against another hike.  The main case for hiking rates is that as long as inflation is expected to return to its target of 2%, in the medium term the Federal Reserve should soon raise rates slightly, so as not to have to raise them a lot later.  The case against another hike is that there is probably still additional labor market slack beyond the 4.7% unemployment rate and that inflation has spent very little time above what is supposed to be a symmetric target in the last ten years.  In addition, the inflation expectations seem to be drifting down slightly, something Ms. Yellen said she will be watching closely.

 

Should the payroll weakness continue or inflation expectations drift down further, rate hikes would likely be off the table.  If, on the other hand, those indicators show renewed signs of a strong economy then the Federal Reserve may finally make the second hike.  Will the election delay things?  The Federal Reserve wants to be seen as divorced from the political scene. The Federal Reserve moved rates in the summer or early fall in 3 of the last 6 presidential elections, not including the crisis year of 2008.  September 21st is another press conference FOMC so expect speculation to be attracted to that meeting, assuming no dramatic surprises in the economy.

 

Overall, I am concerned about the state of the economy and while I expect the last, weak payroll to be an aberration, I will be watching the numbers with more than usual interest next month.

 

 

All information contained herein is for informational purposes only. This is not a solicitation to offer investment advice or services in any state where to do so would be unlawful. Analysis and research are provided for informational purposes only, not for trading or investing purposes. All opinions expressed are as of the date of publication and subject to change. Astor and its affiliates are not liable for the accuracy, usefulness or availability of any such information or liable for any trading or investing based on such information. The investment return and principal value of an investment will fluctuate and an investor’s equity, when liquidated, may be worth more or less than the original cost.


The Astor Economic Index® is a proprietary index created by Astor Investment Management LLC. It represents an aggregation of various economic data points: including output and employment indicators. The Astor Economic Index® is designed to track the varying levels of growth within the U.S. economy by analyzing current trends against historical data. The Astor Economic Index® is not an investable product. When investing, there are multiple factors to consider. The Astor Economic Index® should not be used as the sole determining factor for your investment decisions. The Index is based on retroactive data points and may be subject to hindsight bias. There is no guarantee the Index will produce the same results in the future. The Astor Economic Index® is a tool created and used by Astor. All conclusions are those of Astor and are subject to change.

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May Quick Read on the US Economy

Economic news softened somewhat from my last update.  The most recent readings for employment (as measured by the non-farm payrolls report) showed a slightly weaker pace of growth.  Additionally, much of the bounce in the Institute for Supply Management’s Manufacturing Index was given back last month.  However, we should not exaggerate the weakness.  The current situation in the US economy seems to be self-sustaining demand in the US but with ongoing weak international growth.

 

Our Astor Economic Index® (“AEI”) shows growth levels marginally above the recent lows posted in February, though a bit weaker than a month ago.  The AEI is a proprietary index that evaluates selected employment and output trends in an effort to gauge the current pace of US economic growth.  The chart below shows the last few years of this gauge which has been in a trendless range over that period.usei

The GDP print at 0.5% for the first quarter was weak.  We trailed this possibility last month based on predictions from the nowcasting models published by the Federal Reserve Banks of New York and Atlanta.  These models, with very little live data, are currently showing only modest improvement in the second quarter, about 0.8% at an annual rate.

 

The headwinds from abroad continue.  The chart  below shows the year-over-year percentage change in the volume of world industrial production (as calculated by the CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis).  That is, this index is supposed to ignore currency changes so it should be a bit more steady than market prices.  The deterioration in the last few years is obvious but, as of now, has avoided the unremitting declines associated with the 2001 and 2008 recessions and is still showing that world industrial production is increasing year on year.  However, stagnant growth combined with the strong dollar makes for an external environment unlikely to boost growth this quarter.

world.prod.cng

The lack of follow-through from the previous month may make it difficult for the Fed to raise rates again at their June meeting, but expect speeches from FOMC members to try to keep the dream of hiking alive.  However, the market is having none of it as Fed Funds futures are currently forecasting no change in June.

Overall I expect more of the same positive but tepid growth in the weeks ahead.

 

 

 

All information contained herein is for informational purposes only. This is not a solicitation to offer investment advice or services in any state where to do so would be unlawful. Analysis and research are provided for informational purposes only, not for trading or investing purposes. All opinions expressed are as of the date of publication and subject to change. Astor and its affiliates are not liable for the accuracy, usefulness or availability of any such information or liable for any trading or investing based on such information. The investment return and principal value of an investment will fluctuate and an investor’s equity, when liquidated, may be worth more or less than the original cost.


The Astor Economic Index® is a proprietary index created by Astor Investment Management LLC. It represents an aggregation of various economic data points: including output and employment indicators. The Astor Economic Index® is designed to track the varying levels of growth within the U.S. economy by analyzing current trends against historical data. The Astor Economic Index® is not an investable product. When investing, there are multiple factors to consider. The Astor Economic Index® should not be used as the sole determining factor for your investment decisions. The Index is based on retroactive data points and may be subject to hindsight bias. There is no guarantee the Index will produce the same results in the future. The Astor Economic Index® is a tool created and used by Astor. All conclusions are those of Astor and are subject to change.

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December Economic Read

The US economy continues its pace of modest expansion. Though self-sustaining growth continues to be the most likely outcome, a few soft spots – mainly related to weak growth overseas – continue to worry. I expect the economy to adapt well to the beginning of a shallow and gradual rate hike cycle.

Our Astor Economic Index® shows growth somewhat above the ten year average, though it is lower than a month ago. The AEI is a proprietary index which evaluates selected employment and output trends to try and gauge the current pace of US economic growth.

Good news first. The broad economy continues to expand as can be seen in the steady pace of jobs growth. It may be a promising sign for the future that construction jobs continue to grow at a slightly faster rate than they have since the Great Recession. The housing sector has been weak in the recovery and improvement would be welcome.

The weakness in the manufacturing sector continues as demonstrated by a range of indicators. The latest survey from the ISM was below the line demarcating manufacturing expansion/contraction, though this level is consistent with a growing economy, not a broad recession. This is also reflected in the index of industrial production. The manufacturing sub-index has been weak all year, though not nearly as weak as the mining sub-index.

Source: Bloomberg, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Institute of Supply Management

Source: Bloomberg, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Institute of Supply Management

I see this weakness mainly as a consequence of the slower pace of growth in the Chinese economy leading to broad emerging economy weakness which, in turn, is directly reducing prices on commodities produced in the US as well as reducing overseas demand for US produced intermediate goods. As part of the financial markets reaction to this adjustment the dollar has rallied about 20% against a broad currency index over the last 18 months. The IMF estimates that the dollar movement alone has reduced US GDP growth (by reducing net exports) by about 1% in the last few years.

Will this manufacturing recession spread to the rest of the economy? I do not believe recessions can be forecasted at significant horizons, so I will not lay odds. My guess, however, is that it would take significant further deterioration in the global environment for this to happen. And whatever odds you place on them, it is also possible that the headwinds the US is facing in the external environment will begin to dissipate or at least stop deteriorating next year, a slightly optimistic vision.

The continued decent growth in the US in the face of some overseas challenges is one of the reasons why the Federal Reserve will begin raising rates shortly. They seem to be anticipating the attenuation or reversal of growth constraining factors and hope that by starting rate hikes sooner they will not need to raise them as much. Additionally, if we take the Fed at their word, they are worried about labor market slack being close to completely used up.

If I were on the FOMC I would vote against a hike as the Fed’s inflation target does not seem to be close to binding any time soon and because I would be hoping to decrease the numbers of involuntary part timers as well as try to move the labor participation rate back higher, though demography limits potential gains.

Be that as it may, the Fed is still likely to initiate a rate hike, followed by a stately pace of follow-up rate hikes. Given that the Fed has not begun to shrink its balance sheet (maintaining a substantial stimulus) and that fed funds may only be around 1% a year from now, few serious observers are anticipating that this will seriously hurt the economy.

Overall, I am still cautiously optimistic on the US economy, though less so than last month and I will be watching developments in the export sector closely.


All information contained herein is for informational purposes only. This is not a solicitation to offer investment advice or services in any state where to do so would be unlawful. Analysis and research are provided for informational purposes only, not for trading or investing purposes. All opinions expressed are as of the date of publication and subject to change. Astor and its affiliates are not liable for the accuracy, usefulness or availability of any such information or liable for any trading or investing based on such information. The investment return and principal value of an investment will fluctuate and an investor’s equity, when liquidated, may be worth more or less than the original cost.

The Astor Economic Index® is a proprietary index created by Astor Investment Management LLC. It represents an aggregation of various economic data points: including output and employment indicators. The Astor Economic Index® is designed to track the varying levels of growth within the U.S. economy by analyzing current trends against historical data. The Astor Economic Index® is not an investable product. When investing, there are multiple factors to consider. The Astor Economic Index® should not be used as the sole determining factor for your investment decisions. The Index is based on retroactive data points and may be subject to hindsight bias. There is no guarantee the Index will produce the same results in the future. 312151-336